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to the study. doctor stephen kingsmore led the research team at children's mercy hospitals in kansas city. he's the director for the center for pediatric genomic medicine there. dr. kingsmore, welcome, and thank you for being with us. first of all,-- >> thank you very much. >> warner: how big a breakthrough is this? >> this is a big breakthrough. we've been working toward this goal for a coup of years now. there has been a big gap between the knowledge that we have of genetic diseases, about 35% of them, and the ability for doctors to identify which of these was a problem in any given child with an illness. >> warner: and up until now, how much have you been able to diagnose the d.n.a. abnormalities? how quickly? i mean, i said it can take weeks and weeks, but what's the process that's making it so slow now? >> well, typically, the way that this has been tested is for a doctor to pick the leading candidate gene or part of the d.n.a. code, and to look at just that. it's kind of like fishing with a single fishing line. it can take months. sometimes it takes five years to make a diagnosis. and d
-- europe's troubles; destruction in an ancient syrian city; and the world's oldest playable recording. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: hurricane "sandy" beat a path across eastern cuba and the bahamas today as a category-2 storm. it's being blamed for at least four deaths so far. "sandy" brought strong surf, heavy rain and winds topping 105 miles an hour, and it left behind a trail of downed power lines and uprooted trees. the edges of the storm will likely bring tropical storm conditions to southeast florida, and, as it moves north, the mid- atlantic and northeast could also feel the effects through early next week. forecasters are also predicting "sandy" could collide with a blast of arctic air from the north, creating conditions for a super storm along the east coast. a new wave of ethnic violence has erupted across western myanmar, killing at least 56 people. dozens more were wounded in the clashes between buddhists and muslims. the violence re-ignited on sunday in rakhine state, triggering the worst fighting the country has seen sinc
're putting first responders at danger. >> ifill: on sunday things seemed less urgent for some, taking pictures at ocean city maryland. but by this afternoon, waves were pounding that beach. governor martin o'malley warned of much worse. >> we are ordering and urging all marylanders to stay off the roads for next 36 hours. there are very dangerous conditions out there. we ask you not to put yourselves or your family in jeopardy. >> ifill: norfolk, virginia also had flooding as the storm passed on sunday. in addition a number of states closed schools for at least two days. and canceled was the word of the day for air travel as well. with more than 7,000 flights grounded at east coast airports. >> i really hope that i get to get out of here before the heavy weather hits. i come from florida. so i'm kind of hoping just to get out of the way of the storm. >> ifill: but not everyone managed to get out of the way. the coast guard rescued 14 crew members from a replica tall ship, the h.m.; bounty sailing off cape hatteras north carolina. two were still missing. for more about the hurricane an
in a bus, on her way home from school, in the northeastern city of mingora, in pakistan's swat valley. at a military hospital in peshawar, doctors removed a bullet from her neck. the attack drew worldwide condemnation. speaking at the state department on the first ever international day of the girl, secretary of state hillary clinton said yousufzai is a brave young woman. >> yesterday's attack reminds us of the challenges that girls face, whether it is poverty or marginalization or even violence just for speaking out for their basic rights. >> woodruff: the taliban called the teenager's work an obscenit and pledged to make a new attempt to kill her, if she survives. for more on all of this we turn to "newshour" special correspondent saima mohsin. i spoke to her a short while ago from islamabad, pakistan. saima mohsin, welcome. first of all, we know the taliban are claiming responsibility. what more do we know about that? >> reporter: yes, the taliban have released a statement accepting responsibility and saying this is because they believe malala yousufzai, this 14-year-old girl from
-fought massachusetts senate race, and other congressional contests to watch; plus, new clashes in the syrian city of aleppo; the record- breaking sky jump; and the legacy of arlen specter. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: two americans won the 2012 nobel prize in economics today for research on market design and matching. it affects everything from placing doctors in the right hospitals to pairing students with the schools they most want. the honorees are alvin roth of harvard university, and currently a visiting professor at stanford university, and lloyd shapley, a professor emeritus at the university of california los angeles. wall street had a strong start to the week on news of rising retail sales and better-than- expected earnings at citigroup. the dow jones industrial average gained 95 points to close at 13,424. the nasdaq rose 20 points to close at 3064. a 14-year-old pakistani girl who was shot by a taliban gunman was flown to england today for medical treatment. we have a report from lindsey hilsum of independent television news. >> reporter
of qatar made a landmark trip to gaza today. it was the first visit by any head of state since hamas seized control there five years ago. gazans lined the main road to gaza city, as the emir waved at them from his car. he also met with hamas leaders and urged them to reconcile with the rival fatah faction, which rules the west bank. israel maintains a sea blockade of gaza, but qatar has promised to deliver hundreds of million dollars in aid by land route through egypt. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we return to the final presidential debate with a closer look at the arguable statements made by both candidates. margaret warner has our report. >> warner: last night's final presidential debate took on a lo questions. and the answers at times raised further questions. as we did last week, today we reviewed some of what was said and how it matches the record. starting with mitt romney's charge that from the beginning of his term, president obama was apologizing overseas for america's actions. >> the president began what i've called an apology tour
elizabeth city state and sawnt augustine. registering new voters and bringing in actress journey smolet to mix with the crowd. 18-year-old sure petty was fired up by casting her first vote >> everybody is excitedded. everybody's really excited about getting obama in for a second term. >> brown: of course for mitt romney this is perhaps even more a must-win state. he's made numerous visits and republicans insist they won't let things slip away again. bob lockwood is communications director for the north carolina g.o.p. >> comparatively from where we were in 2008 to where we are now we've made 20 times the amount of phone calls, more than 100 times the amount of door knocks. over two million voter contacts more than we did in all of 2008 in north carolina. we're doing a great job getting our message out >> brown: one final wild card here the role that social issues might play. in may north carolina voters overwhelming passed a ban on same sex marriage. the very next day president obama announced that he supports gay marriage. sunday morning services at white rock baptist church in durham,
in the dutch city of rotterdam. seven paintings were stolen, including works by monet, picasso, and matisse, among others. they're part of a private collection that was being exhibited publicly for the first time. police did not explain how the robbers managed it, but one museum security expert said they had to get through a sophisticated security system. >> the response was very quick. thieves were not able to steal many paintings but unfortunately they got out a few paintings. these paintings will remain on the crime scene for many many years, maybe because they can't sell them they might destroy them. again it's impossible to sell them. >> sreenivasan: the paintings would be worth hundreds of millions of dollars if they were sold legally. the c.e.o. of citigroup abruptly resigned today, effective immediately. vikram pandit and his chief operating officer, john havens, both stepped down. citigroup said michael corbat will step in as c.e.o. he had been the bank's chief executive for europe, the middle east and africa. the company gave no explanation for the sudden departures, but the "wall
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)